KAWITA Vatanajyankur

SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

THE SCALE OF JUSTICE

Alongside 57th Venice Biennale

Arsenale Docks, Venice, Italy 

As part of 'Islands in the Stream' presented by Alamak! Project

Curated by Yoichi Nakamuta

 

 

 

MACHINIZED

Stills Gallery, Sydney, Australia

In Machinized, Kawita Vatanajyankur is a tool, a moving part in the machine. She transforms herself into food production equipment in performance videos that restage processes such as boxing eggs and weighing leafy greens. Like her previously celebrated works, this new series is graphic and glorious, sharing the same eye-catching allure that enamors us to ads. The confronting nature of her endurance performances, however, interrupts this seductive surface.

The repetitive and arduous tasks that Vatanajyankur performs parody a pervasive slippage between human and machine, and foreground the forgotten body within a technologically accelerating world. Beyond this literal translation, these gestures also make visible the invisible mechanisms that govern women’s everyday labour in her birthplace of Thailand. In both contexts, paring seduction and confrontation proves a powerful device in Vatanajyankur’s hands—a Trojan horse for tackling entrenched attitudes toward gender, equality and work.

In The Scale of Justice (2016), for instance, the artist becomes a traditional ‘beam scale’, balancing hanging baskets from her arms and feet. Against the jewel-coloured backdrop of sapphire pink, the baskets fill up and overflow with luscious green veg while we watch as her balance and composure are increasingly tested, her corporeal and psychological limits measured. Vatanajyankur’s self-deprecating humour is also seductive. In Egg Holder (2016) she even invites her face to be egged. Aiming to catch them in her mouth in this ill-fated feat, her yoke-covered face is displayed over half a dozen screens.

These performances are slapstick, colourful and absurd: bells and whistles to disguise careful choreography, extraordinary skill and acute social critique. By maintaining a ‘happy smile’ while pushing herself to extremes, she pays testament to female grace and resilience in the face of injustice and invisibility. Amid the pretty colours of fresh food, however, this feminine fortitude is also presented as poignant and complex. It is an unpalatable reminder of the self-inflicted violence—of body and mind—that comes with our compliance to certain social norms.

Vatanajyankur’s deliberate self-objectification suggests that our bodies are a medium for submission but also for resistance. This brave, beautiful and playful work frees her from a culture of compliance but also from her mind. As she explains, it turns her body into sculpture.

 

 

 

TOOLS

The Jam Factory, Bangkok, Thailand

 

WORK 

Stills Gallery, Sydney, Australia

 

 

In association with Head On Photo Festival, Stills is proud to present one of the most exciting new contributors to Asian-Pacific video art, Thai-Australian Kawita Vatanajyankur, and her arresting new series Work (2015).

Endurance art has rarely been so pretty. Alluring luminous yellows, citrus greens and bubblegum pinks are distinctive of the artist’s aesthetic—a visual language of consumption and desire that speaks to a world of instant gratification and flattened complexity. However, this heightened superficiality lures you in only to confound your expectations—Vatanajyankur’s videos offer a powerful examination of the psychological, social and cultural ways of viewing and valuing women’s everyday labour.

In the four videos comprising Work (2015), Vatanajyankur presents an uncanny restaging of a local, fresh fruit market. Engaging the tools and tasks common to its workers, including weighing bananas, juicing oranges and precariously balancing watermelons in plastic crates, Vatanajyankur undertakes physical experiments that playfully, and often painfully, test her body’s limits. In Carrying Pole (2015), for instance, bananas are thrown into woven baskets that hang off her body, which is suspended from string like a set of scales. But as the fruits pile up, and in turn weigh her down, this scale works to gauge the artist’s physical and mental strength; a challenge that is both unavoidably compelling, and uncomfortable to watch, in—excuse the pun—equal measures.

Vatanajyankur’s exploration of everyday and domestic work is particularly telling of her Thai homeland. A place where, for many, daily chores aren’t always assisted by electronic contraptions or white goods but are time-consuming, physically exhausting, and often the task of women. The videos’ happy, day-glow colours, dark humour and undercurrents of violence, however, bring a universality and contemporary currency to the historical trajectory of feminist art. It is telling, for instance, that she describes her performances as “meditation postures”, when such gruelling tests of resilience and fear are quite the opposite of what we might think of now as zen. But, for Vatanajyankur, extreme physical endurance offers a way to free herself from her mind: a mechanism to lose her sense of being. This deliberate objectification, she says, turns her body into sculpture.

Like her previously acclaimed works, this powerful new series intersects the long histories of ritual, craft and performance with the relatively new medium of video, as a way to redress how women’s work has been considered a lesser form of creativity, than the ‘fine arts’ not long ago epitomized by literally man-made representations of the female body. Uniquely, Vatanajyankur’s work is accessible and visually appealing: substantial in its conceptual rigour, and, at the same time, entertaining. Its lasting effect resonates deeply by asking probing questions; what are the limitations of our bodies, the continuing challenges of mundane labour, and the ongoing tasks for feminism in a globalized and digitally networked world?

 

PLAY

Beam Contemporary, Melbourne, Australia

29th March - 26th April 2014

Play, a suite of new video works by Kawita Vatanajyankur. These bold performance-based videos continue Vatanajyankur’s exploration of the domestic environment. Set against intensely bright and colourful backdrops, the videos entangle objects and bodies in ways that are uncanny, humorous and often disturbing. 

 

THE ICE SHAVER 

Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne, Australia

24th May - 14th July 2013

On the Night Projection Window (6pm - 1 am)

View my page on CCP's website

 

The Ice Shaver is part of Kawita Vatanajyankur's performative video series Tools, in which she aims to reconstruct the elements of traditional seventeenth-century      painting—often portraying a female figure, usually posed as a still object within a domestic work space. Vatanajyankur's work illustrates the relationship between the female body and domestic objects, which physically—sometimes violently—confront each other until the body succumbs and is pressured to work with the object; merge with it; become part of it; and eventually, is transformed into a sculptured domestic tool. The action and reaction of the body reflects the physical, psychological and cultural aspects of female endurance, physical resilience, strength and insecurity.

 

SPONSORED BY 

 

TOOLS

Beam Contemporary, Melbourne, Australia

1st - 16th March 2013

Click for PRESS RELEASE

View info on Beam Contemporary website

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                Soaked,Video Still, 2013

                                                                                                                                                                                                          Tools at Beam Contemporary

                                                                                                                                                                                                           Tools at Beam Contemporary

 

This new body of video work reconstructs elements of traditional 17th century painting that would often pose female bodies as still-life subjects within domestic spaces. With this scenario as my foundation, I aimed to bring the female body into a new stark environment where body and domestic object conflate and seem to physically react and violently communicate with each other. In doing so, the work is reflected on the physical, psychological and cultural aspects of feminine endurance, strength and insecurity.

PRESENTED AND SUPPORTED BY

 

DOMESTICATED

Trocadero Art Space, Melbourne, Australia

25th July-11th August 2012

Click for installation view HERE 

Domesticated comprises series of three work, "Onto Fabrics 1", "Onto Fabrics 2" which was originally exhibited at Seventh gallery in early 2012 and most recent work, "Wet Rag".  

 

BODY AND ELEMENTS

(Click for installation view here) 

Seventh Gallery, Melbourne, Australia

View info on Seventh Gallery website

28th March-14th April 2012

                                                                                                                                                  

                                                                                                                                                        

My series of video and performance work “Onto Fabrics” is focused on the female body, fabrics and household object within darken, unknown spaces, unfamiliar environments and uncomfortable atmosphere. As a medium under different distressing circumstances, my own body is affected and forced by the elements, objects, spaces and other human actions to transform, merge, become a part of these ambiguous surroundings, objects and environments Eventually, the merged body as well as the fabrics covering it is mingled and turned into a sculpture. 

The body action, reaction and movement within the spaces towards the pressure by the elements and objects reflects feminism, violence, endurance communication in a cultural way and indicates a psychological and corporeal aspect of viewing the human condition.

 

 

PRESENTED BY  

 

 

 

WALKING ON WATER

First Site Gallery, Melbourne, Australia

 25 May-4 June 2011

 

Water expresses beauty, peacefulness and the idea of feminism. However, water becomes violent by human body actions, facial expression as well as effects from the reaction between two things-body and water, objects and water, body and fabrics. Kawita Vatanajyankur uses human bodies including her own, as a medium to experiment different water effects and document them in videos and photographs. Each of her performances aim to reveal the reaction of human body, how it visually appears in different times, light and place. By the use of water and fabrics with human bodies, shape and forms of the body always change and sometimes represent the idea of struggle, anxiety and lost by the uncomfortable atmosphere.  

PRESENTED BY 


 

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS

 

MELBOURNE CENTRAL ART LOOP 

Melbourne Central is excited to be the host of Australia's largest evolving exhibition of video art on display outside of an institution.
 
The Melbourne Art Loop is a new, permanent city gallery featuring fifteen state-of-the-art LCD screens and five projector portals suspended along the laneway in our new Lower Ground precinct. Changing regularly and projecting continuously, each exhibition will include artworks by internationally renowned emerging and established Australian artists.
 
Art Loop at Melbourne Central is curated by Andy Dinan of MARS Gallery, and will feature collaborations with some of Melbourne's renowned artist-run spaces.

 

ASIATOPA FESTIVAL

Asia-Pacific Triennial of Performing Arts

Melbourne Arts Centre, Melbourne, Australia

Asia TOPA: Asia-Pacific Triennial of Performing Arts is an artistic celebration of our relationship with contemporary Asia. Vital, fresh and always unpredictable, Asia TOPA offers a city-wide window onto the creative imaginations fuelling the many cultures of our region.

Cultural engagement is key to expressing who we are, where we’ve come from, and how we connect with each other across the Asia-Pacific region. The dazzling array of artists featured in Asia TOPA will provide new ways of understanding the deep connections that run between us all.

 

 

This unprecedented program is brought together by some of Victoria’s top cultural institutions including:

  • Arts Centre Melbourne
  • Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA)
  • Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
  • Chunky Move
  • Federation Square
  • Malthouse Theatre
  • Melbourne Recital Centre (MRC)
  • Melbourne Symphony Orchestra (MSO)
  • Melbourne Theatre Company (MTC)
  • Museum Victoria
  • National Gallery of Victoria (NGV)
  • State Library Victoria (SLV)
  • The Australian Ballet (TAB)
  • Victorian College of the Arts (VCA)

The inaugural event also engages a host of international and national collaborators and Program Partners. Local Partners include: City of Melbourne, Next Wave Festival, Melbourne Writers Festival, Arts House, Footscray Community Arts Centre, Bluebottle, Tipping Point, Dancehouse, Ilbijerri, Chamber Made, Performing Lines, Multicultural Arts Victoria, Asialink, Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, University of Melbourne, Deakin University, Polyglot and MPavilion, among others.

 

PLAY2: BLINDSIDE

 

 

BLINDSIDE presents PLAY2  – a selection of single channel video work from 8  artists from Melbourne, Thailand, Indonesia and New Zealand. These artists explore the potential of the moving image to convey their histories, fantasies, dreams and speculations.

PLAY2 is an offsite extension of BLINDSIDE PLAY, a video space which is dedicated to showing contemporary experimental single-channel works from local and international artists. PLAY2, is presented in partnership with Federation Square and screened at the Big Screen as part of Fed TV.

 

 

 

THAILAND EYE

AT: Saatchi Gallery, London, England

Date: 25 November - 3 January 2016 

AT: Bangkok Arts and Culture Centre, Bangkok, Thailand

Date: 18 March - 7 August 2016 

Date : 18 March - 07 August 2016



The first major showcase of contemporary Thai art in the UK hosted in celebration of the 60th anniversary of the Thai Princess, Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn. The exhibition shines a spotlight on Thailand's contemporary art scene and features the work of 23 renowned and emerging artists.

The exhibition, a collaboration between the Thai Ministry of Culture, Saatchi Gallery, Prudential Corporation Asia and Parallel Contemporary Art, is the latest show in the Prudential Eye Programme, an initiative aimed at nurturing artistic talent in Asia. It is supported by the Thailand Convention and Exhibition Bureau and Bangkok Art & Culture Centre, and sponsored by Thai Beverage Public Company Limited, Thai Airways International Public Company Limited, King Power, Siam Piwat Company Limited and Jim Thompson Foundation.

Bringing together more established artists Rikrit Tiravanija, Navin Rawanchaikul and Udomsak Krisanamis who have achieved international fame in recent years, alongside emerging artists, Thailand Eye presented by Prudential highlights an exciting group of artists who strive to balance Thai cultural, social and political history alongside the forces of globalisation.

The exhibition is curated by Professor Apinan Poshyananda, Permanent Secretary for the Thai Ministry of Culture, Nigel Hurst, CEO of the Saatchi Gallery and Serenella Ciclitira, Founder of Parallel Contemporary Art.

The exhibition features work by Bussaraporn Thongchai, Chatchai Puipia, Chusak Srikwan, Dow Wasiksiri, Kamolpan Chotivichai, Kawita Vatanajyankur, Kosit Juntaratip, Krit Ngamsom, Manit Sriwanichpoom, Natee Utarit, Navin Rawanchaikul, Nopchai Ungkavatanapong, Pannaphan Yodmanee, Panya Vijinthanasarn, Paweena Raksasna, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Sakarin Krue-On, Somboon Hormtientong and Songchai Buachoom

A number of the artists reference Thai culture in a playful manner. Chustak Srikwan provides a contemporary take on traditional Thai leather engraving, in his photographic series 'Pink Man' Manit Sriwanichpoom appears starkly contrasted against the backdrop of the tourist sites in Thailand and Rikrit Tiravanija uses cooking utensils to reference earlier works featuring communal meals of Thai food cooked for gallery visitors by the artist. Other artists in the show including Dow Wasikiri and Navin Rawanchaikul explore issues around identity in new and arresting ways. The exhibition embraces the diverse nature of artistic practice within Thailand and demonstrates the bold invention, innovation and experimentation being undertaken by this new generation of artists.

An accompanying book, Thailand Eye: Contemporary Thai Art features the work of 75 Thai artists, including the 23 exhibiting artists. Edited by Serenella Ciclitira and published by SKIRA, the book offers an unprecedented in-depth look at the country's contemporary artists.

 

 

 

 

JAGUAR ASIA TECH ART PRIZE 2015 FINALISTS EXHIBITION

 AT : Taipei World Trade Center 

DATE: 29 October - 2 November 2015 

The Jaguar Asia Art Tech Prize aims to encourage artists in the field of tecnho art. By doing so, it hopes to enhance the development of techno art. The prize aims to reward the most innovative artist in the techno art field of that year and also the artist that can bring the most positive impact for humanity and the environment. Vatanajyankur has been selected as one of the 5 finalists for Jaguar Asia Tech Art Prize 2015 for her series 'Work'. 

 

  

MELBOURNE ART FAIR 2014

 The Melbourne Art Fair is one of Australasia’s leading contemporary art events, showcasing 

outstanding work from the region’s best galleries.

The Fair took place at the Royal Exhibition Building in Carlton from  the 13 – 17 August.

 

The Robes (2014), The Basket (2014) and Wet Rag (2014) As part of Stills Gallery stand.

 

 

 The Ice Shaver (2013) as part of the MAF Video Program curated by Screen Space. 

 

PROXIMITY

An art exhibition of distance and relativity (As part of Bangkok Art and Culture Centre's exhibition), National Museum, Szczecin, Poland

29 June - 07 September 2014 

Suppose in the infinite universe, there are particles like tiny units circulating in various corners randomly racing in the midst of the vast world, what is the possibility of the particles from different orbits crashing and resting for a moment to connect and relate? Such hypothesis raises a question on the probability of the world in an alternative dimensions.  As space, time and distance could be perceived in many ways, one of them arises from the obvious; understanding a definite rule of space as one incident, or recognizing shortness and length between reference points as one distance. However, here we ask for an alternative, where a rule of measurement is regarded as one perception. Merging theory of physics with anthropology, from point A to point B, in the humanistic current, space, time and distance is relevant.
 
Meaning and apprehension are always fluctuated by the formula of basic reality. Being closer to one thing is equivalent to understanding more. However, in the world reorganized from the micro level, distance is deconstructed and assimilated into a trait. A new identity is formed through the ceremony of living in transition. In such time, meaning and apprehension depends on momentum of individuality. Proximity and distance are new interpretations of the world. In this dimension, art carries on another message that is not presented to be understood, but to be felt at the most fundamental level of being human. That is comprised of weakness and strength, desperation and courage, trapping in a suspended condition, attempting to flee from, questioning the questions and dissatisfying with the answers, searching and longing through time and distance, and even a discovery that comes as a surprise. Under these various stages, it reveals the simultaneity of living through diverse individuals, of their own perspectives, in varying places existing in proximity and distance, disseminating the relativity. 
 
Understanding deep stories/experiences we are closing to and seeing surface of experiences we are far away from is a hybrid viewpoint at both micro and macro levels. It is a proposition with a holistic value in order to connect and circulate the spontaneity of sympathy and care. When cognitive value, as deepened, is extended and expanded its meaning to those in a different part of the world, that is when maintaining an identity in one place is equivalent to maintaining another, depending on each other independently. Relation is a relativity that needs no rigid rules to breath. As such, space, time, proximity and distance could cross the boundary of the principles to the science of life, with deep ecology that the comprehension of momentum in the world in combination with the trust in human instincts will propel the possibilities.
- See more at: http://en.bacc.or.th/event/P-ROX-IMITY--An-art-exhibition-of-distance-and-relativity.html#sthash.diyYVx2B.dpuf

Suppose in the infinite universe, there are particles like tiny units circulating in various corners randomly racing in the midst of the vast world, what is the possibility of the particles from different orbits crashing and resting for a moment to connect and relate? Such hypothesis raises a question on the probability of the world in an alternative dimensions.  As space, time and distance could be perceived in many ways, one of them arises from the obvious; understanding a definite rule of space as one incident, or recognizing shortness and length between reference points as one distance. However, here we ask for an alternative, where a rule of measurement is regarded as one perception. Merging theory of physics with anthropology, from point A to point B, in the humanistic current, space, time and distance is relevant.
 
Meaning and apprehension are always fluctuated by the formula of basic reality. Being closer to one thing is equivalent to understanding more. However, in the world reorganized from the micro level, distance is deconstructed and assimilated into a trait. A new identity is formed through the ceremony of living in transition. In such time, meaning and apprehension depends on momentum of individuality. Proximity and distance are new interpretations of the world. In this dimension, art carries on another message that is not presented to be understood, but to be felt at the most fundamental level of being human. That is comprised of weakness and strength, desperation and courage, trapping in a suspended condition, attempting to flee from, questioning the questions and dissatisfying with the answers, searching and longing through time and distance, and even a discovery that comes as a surprise. Under these various stages, it reveals the simultaneity of living through diverse individuals, of their own perspectives, in varying places existing in proximity and distance, disseminating the relativity. 
 
Understanding deep stories/experiences we are closing to and seeing surface of experiences we are far away from is a hybrid viewpoint at both micro and macro levels. It is a proposition with a holistic value in order to connect and circulate the spontaneity of sympathy and care. When cognitive value, as deepened, is extended and expanded its meaning to those in a different part of the world, that is when maintaining an identity in one place is equivalent to maintaining another, depending on each other independently. Relation is a relativity that needs no rigid rules to breath. As such, space, time, proximity and distance could cross the boundary of the principles to the science of life, with deep ecology that the comprehension of momentum in the world in combination with the trust in human instincts will propel the possibilities.
- See more at: http://en.bacc.or.th/event/P-ROX-IMITY--An-art-exhibition-of-distance-and-relativity.html#sthash.diyYVx2B.dpuf

Suppose in the infinite universe, there are particles like tiny units circulating in various corners randomly racing in the midst of the vast world, what is the possibility of the particles from different orbits crashing and resting for a moment to connect and relate? Such hypothesis raises a question on the probability of the world in an alternative dimensions.  As space, time and distance could be perceived in many ways, one of them arises from the obvious; understanding a definite rule of space as one incident, or recognizing shortness and length between reference points as one distance. However, here we ask for an alternative, where a rule of measurement is regarded as one perception. Merging theory of physics with anthropology, from point A to point B, in the humanistic current, space, time and distance is relevant.
 
Meaning and apprehension are always fluctuated by the formula of basic reality. Being closer to one thing is equivalent to understanding more. However, in the world reorganized from the micro level, distance is deconstructed and assimilated into a trait. A new identity is formed through the ceremony of living in transition. In such time, meaning and apprehension depends on momentum of individuality. Proximity and distance are new interpretations of the world. In this dimension, art carries on another message that is not presented to be understood, but to be felt at the most fundamental level of being human. That is comprised of weakness and strength, desperation and courage, trapping in a suspended condition, attempting to flee from, questioning the questions and dissatisfying with the answers, searching and longing through time and distance, and even a discovery that comes as a surprise. Under these various stages, it reveals the simultaneity of living through diverse individuals, of their own perspectives, in varying places existing in proximity and distance, disseminating the relativity.
 
Understanding deep stories/experiences we are closing to and seeing surface of experiences we are far away from is a hybrid viewpoint at both micro and macro levels. It is a proposition with a holistic value in order to connect and circulate the spontaneity of sympathy and care. When cognitive value, as deepened, is extended and expanded its meaning to those in a different part of the world, that is when maintaining an identity in one place is equivalent to maintaining another, depending on each other independently. Relation is a relativity that needs no rigid rules to breath. As such, space, time, proximity and distance could cross the boundary of the principles to the science of life, with deep ecology that the comprehension of momentum in the world in combination with the trust in human instincts will propel the possibilities.

See more at:

http://en.bacc.or.th/event/P-ROX-IMITY--An-art-exhibition-of-distance and-relativity.html#sthash.7Q4Kfvm0.dpuf

 

LA MOVIDA

Biblioteca Municipal de Barranco, Lima, Peru

 

 

Suppose in the infinite universe, there are particles like tiny units circulating in various corners randomly racing in the midst of the vast world, what is the possibility of the particles from different orbits crashing and resting for a moment to connect and relate? Such hypothesis raises a question on the probability of the world in an alternative dimensions.  As space, time and distance could be perceived in many ways, one of them arises from the obvious; understanding a definite rule of space as one incident, or recognizing shortness and length between reference points as one distance. However, here we ask for an alternative, where a rule of measurement is regarded as one perception. Merging theory of physics with anthropology, from point A to point B, in the humanistic current, space, time and distance is relevant.
 
Meaning and apprehension are always fluctuated by the formula of basic reality. Being closer to one thing is equivalent to understanding more. However, in the world reorganized from the micro level, distance is deconstructed and assimilated into a trait. A new identity is formed through the ceremony of living in transition. In such time, meaning and apprehension depends on momentum of individuality. Proximity and distance are new interpretations of the world. In this dimension, art carries on another message that is not presented to be understood, but to be felt at the most fundamental level of being human. That is comprised of weakness and strength, desperation and courage, trapping in a suspended condition, attempting to flee from, questioning the questions and dissatisfying with the answers, searching and longing through time and distance, and even a discovery that comes as a surprise. Under these various stages, it reveals the simultaneity of living through diverse individuals, of their own perspectives, in varying places existing in proximity and distance, disseminating the relativity. 
 
Understanding deep stories/experiences we are closing to and seeing surface of experiences we are far away from is a hybrid viewpoint at both micro and macro levels. It is a proposition with a holistic value in order to connect and circulate the spontaneity of sympathy and care. When cognitive value, as deepened, is extended and expanded its meaning to those in a different part of the world, that is when maintaining an identity in one place is equivalent to maintaining another, depending on each other independently. Relation is a relativity that needs no rigid rules to breath. As such, space, time, proximity and distance could cross the boundary of the principles to the science of life, with deep ecology that the comprehension of momentum in the world in combination with the trust in human instincts will propel the possibilities.
- See more at: http://en.bacc.or.th/event/P-ROX-IMITY--An-art-exhibition-of-distance-and-relativity.html#sthash.diyYVx2B.dpuf

THE ICE SHAVER

The Ice Shaver, Sencus Luoghi per l'Arte Contemporanea, Florence, Italy

13 June - 5 July 2014

 

TOTALLY LOOKS LIKE

 

 Stills Gallery, Sydney, Australia

11 June - 12 July 2014  

Back in 2010, The New York Times, critic David Colman wrote that the smart phone ‘self-snap’ was “so common that it is changing photography itself”. The artists in Totally Looks Like expand this idea, working with performance, objects, photo and video to consider the changing relationship between medium and maker.

Jaimie Warren remakes images that she finds on popular Internet sites as self-portraits. In her series Totally Looks Like (which inspired the title of the show) she inhabits humorous image pairings, in which a person, often a celebrity, looks uncannily like someone or something else. Where as, in Celebrities as Food & Food’lebrities, Warren recreates images that digitally merge pictures of food and celebrities. For instance, in Self-portrait as Lasagna Del Ray by thestrutny (2012) Warren is, all at once, herself, a lasagna, and pop singer, Lana Del Ray. With her head on a plate, face covered in sauce, and hidden behind lips the size of sausages, Warren’s total immersion in popular culture is apparently as physical as it is psychological. The beauty of Warren’s gruesome self-portraits is that you come away with absolutely no idea of what she looks like. However, they do produce a highly sophisticated portrait of a contemporary self that is as malleable and messy as the unsophisticated make-up and materials that she uses to craft them.

In Thai-Australian artist Kawita Vatanajyankur’s three videos The Basket, The Robes and Wet Rag, the artist is both symbolically and literally the material making the work—she is the rag that another woman uses to wash the floor, the wet clothing that is caught in a washing basket, and the fabric that hangs over a line, drying in the breeze. This self-deprecating humour, like Warren’s, belies a quiet challenge to high and low-brow distinctions. Vatanajyankur reframes the way craft and fabric-based production have historically been associated with women’s domesticity and considered a lesser form of creativity than the ‘fine arts’ of sculpture and painting.

Crafting himself as an animated potter avatar, Jacob Ogden Smith appears on screen in his installation Pottery Three Ways. As he works away behind his virtual potter’s wheel, the products of Ogden Smith’s semi-fictional ‘free time’ spill out into the gallery, as an odd array of pots and objects. These are imperfect copies of pottery, recreated from film and television. Using processes from 3D printing to traditional clay sculpting, these new forms distort into caricatures of their never-real ‘originals’. By blurring the real and the symbolic, the traditional and the technologically new, 2 and 3 dimensions, this installation reflects how digitised production is changing the nature of the artefact and of the relationship between maker and object.

Jackson Eaton’s Melfies, a selection of printed T-shirts, are hung on retail racks around the gallery. Eaton’s Melfies, meaning ‘mirror-selfies’, aren’t taken in the mirror. Instead he wanted a reflection of himself based on how other people saw him—and created these inverted versions of self-portraits by handing his camera over. A gallery director, his mum, and a photolab attendant, are among the real life characters from his everyday, who got to tell Eaton where and how to pose as himself. The resulting deadpan images are awkward, oddly intimate, and genuinely funny, both an over-share of Eaton’s private world, and a universal insight into our shared over-preoccupation with, as he puts it, “how we see others seeing us”.

Lucas Davidson converges the materiality of media and the ‘self’ in his large-scale video projection Internal Monologue. Davidson separates photo self-portraits from their paper, before filming the emulsion as it moves in water. His facial features eerily fold and unfold, twist and turn, in a constant state of change that is as disturbing as meditative and mesmeric. Liberating the medium from its usual constraints suggests the transient flow of consciousness, and the illusion that we create, as he puts it, “a seemingly permanent sense of ‘self’ out of a series of endless disjointed moments.”

Lifting My Weight, a new video work by Jodie Whalen, continues her exploration into transformative everyday rituals. In contrast to the other self-portraits in Totally Looks Like, Whalen doesn’t appear in hers. Instead the viewer shares her point of view, joining her on daily sunrise walks up local hills in suburbia, a banal routine that we find becomes magical and metaphysical. The weight Whalen is trying to lift isn’t from her body, but from her spirit: the process of art making and meditation become one. But her perspective is also ‘at one’ with her portable video recorder, in a collapsing of medium and maker that means Whalen, as much as the technology, mediates what we see.

By blurring the line that separates our selves from the technologies we use to express ourselves, the artists in Totally Looks Like explore the self as medium.

 

NEW GRAND NARRATIVE

Testing Grounds, (as part of Next Wave's Festival 2014 Launch), Melbourne, Australia

28th March 2014

 

ROOFTOP TRANSMISSIONS

Rooftop Cinema, Melbourne, Australia

17 February 2014

 

Co-presented alongside Channels Festival, Speakeasy Cinema and the National Gallery of Victoria for their Melbourne Now program, Rooftop Transmissions features work from Arie Rain Glorie, Bindi Cole, Callum Cooper, Clare Rae, Deborah White, Diego Ramirez, Greg Penn, Ian Haig, Jessica McElhinney, Joe Hamilton, Kawita Vatanajyankur, Keith Deverell, Kenny Pittock, Nelson Walkom, Kieren Seymour, Layla Vardo, Lorraine Heller-Nicholas, Nassiem Valamanesh, Nicole Breedon, Simone Hine& Linda Neil, SubTEXT, Swanbrero and Zoe Scoglio. 

Head over to the Rooftop Cinema tonight for Rooftop Transmissions, a presentation of 22 of Melbourne’s best film shorts.

Co-presented alongside Channels Festival, Speakeasy Cinema and the National Gallery of Victoria for their Melbourne Now program, Rooftop Transmissions features works from Arie Rain Glorie, Bindi Cole, Callum Cooper, Clare Rae, Deborah White, Diego Ramirez, Greg Penn, Ian Haig, Jessica McElhinney, Joe Hamilton, Kawita Vatanajyankur, Keith Deverell, Kenny Pittock and Nelson Walkom, Kieren Seymour, Layla Vardo, Lorraine Heller-Nicholas, Nassiem Valamanesh, Nicole Breedon, Simone Hine & Linda Neil, subTEXT, Swanbrero and Zoe Scoglio.

Rooftop Transmissions will happen tonight from 8pm. Entry is free.

- See more at: http://www.beat.com.au/arts/rooftop-cinema-presents-transmissions-melbourne-now#sthash.x70BiBwx.dpuf

Head over to the Rooftop Cinema tonight for Rooftop Transmissions, a presentation of 22 of Melbourne’s best film shorts.

Co-presented alongside Channels Festival, Speakeasy Cinema and the National Gallery of Victoria for their Melbourne Now program, Rooftop Transmissions features works from Arie Rain Glorie, Bindi Cole, Callum Cooper, Clare Rae, Deborah White, Diego Ramirez, Greg Penn, Ian Haig, Jessica McElhinney, Joe Hamilton, Kawita Vatanajyankur, Keith Deverell, Kenny Pittock and Nelson Walkom, Kieren Seymour, Layla Vardo, Lorraine Heller-Nicholas, Nassiem Valamanesh, Nicole Breedon, Simone Hine & Linda Neil, subTEXT, Swanbrero and Zoe Scoglio.

Rooftop Transmissions will happen tonight from 8pm. Entry is free.

- See more at: http://www.beat.com.au/arts/rooftop-cinema-presents-transmissions-melbourne-now#sthash.x70BiBwx.dpuf

Head over to the Rooftop Cinema tonight for Rooftop Transmissions, a presentation of 22 of Melbourne’s best film shorts.

Co-presented alongside Channels Festival, Speakeasy Cinema and the National Gallery of Victoria for their Melbourne Now program, Rooftop Transmissions features works from Arie Rain Glorie, Bindi Cole, Callum Cooper, Clare Rae, Deborah White, Diego Ramirez, Greg Penn, Ian Haig, Jessica McElhinney, Joe Hamilton, Kawita Vatanajyankur, Keith Deverell, Kenny Pittock and Nelson Walkom, Kieren Seymour, Layla Vardo, Lorraine Heller-Nicholas, Nassiem Valamanesh, Nicole Breedon, Simone Hine & Linda Neil, subTEXT, Swanbrero and Zoe Scoglio.

Rooftop Transmissions will happen tonight from 8pm. Entry is free.

- See more at: http://www.beat.com.au/arts/rooftop-cinema-presents-transmissions-melbourne-now#sthash.x70BiBwx.dpuf

 

Head over to the Rooftop Cinema tonight for Rooftop Transmissions, a presentation of 22 of Melbourne’s best film shorts.

Co-presented alongside Channels Festival, Speakeasy Cinema and the National Gallery of Victoria for their Melbourne Now program, Rooftop Transmissions features works from Arie Rain Glorie, Bindi Cole, Callum Cooper, Clare Rae, Deborah White, Diego Ramirez, Greg Penn, Ian Haig, Jessica McElhinney, Joe Hamilton, Kawita Vatanajyankur, Keith Deverell, Kenny Pittock and Nelson Walkom, Kieren Seymour, Layla Vardo, Lorraine Heller-Nicholas, Nassiem Valamanesh, Nicole Breedon, Simone Hine & Linda Neil, subTEXT, Swanbrero and Zoe Scoglio.

Rooftop Transmissions will happen tonight from 8pm. Entry is free.

- See more at: http://www.beat.com.au/arts/rooftop-cinema-presents-transmissions-melbourne-now#sthash.x70BiBwx.dpuf

Head over to the Rooftop Cinema tonight for Rooftop Transmissions, a presentation of 22 of Melbourne’s best film shorts.

Co-presented alongside Channels Festival, Speakeasy Cinema and the National Gallery of Victoria for their Melbourne Now program, Rooftop Transmissions features works from Arie Rain Glorie, Bindi Cole, Callum Cooper, Clare Rae, Deborah White, Diego Ramirez, Greg Penn, Ian Haig, Jessica McElhinney, Joe Hamilton, Kawita Vatanajyankur, Keith Deverell, Kenny Pittock and Nelson Walkom, Kieren Seymour, Layla Vardo, Lorraine Heller-Nicholas, Nassiem Valamanesh, Nicole Breedon, Simone Hine & Linda Neil, subTEXT, Swanbrero and Zoe Scoglio.

Rooftop Transmissions will happen tonight from 8pm. Entry is free.

- See more at: http://www.beat.com.au/arts/rooftop-cinema-presents-transmissions-melbourne-now#sthash.x70BiBwx.dpuf

 

Head over to the Rooftop Cinema tonight for Rooftop Transmissions, a presentation of 22 of Melbourne’s best film shorts.

Co-presented alongside Channels Festival, Speakeasy Cinema and the National Gallery of Victoria for their Melbourne Now program, Rooftop Transmissions features works from Arie Rain Glorie, Bindi Cole, Callum Cooper, Clare Rae, Deborah White, Diego Ramirez, Greg Penn, Ian Haig, Jessica McElhinney, Joe Hamilton, Kawita Vatanajyankur, Keith Deverell, Kenny Pittock and Nelson Walkom, Kieren Seymour, Layla Vardo, Lorraine Heller-Nicholas, Nassiem Valamanesh, Nicole Breedon, Simone Hine & Linda Neil, subTEXT, Swanbrero and Zoe Scoglio.

Rooftop Transmissions will happen tonight from 8pm. Entry is free.

- See more at: http://www.beat.com.au/arts/rooftop-cinema-presents-transmissions-melbourne-now#sthash.x70BiBwx.dpuf

IKONO ON AIR FESTIVAL

Ikono TV, Berlin, Germany

6 – 29 September 2013

Click HERE to read about The Ice Shaver, 2013 on Ikono TV's website

ikono On Air Festival - Official trailer from ikono tv on Vimeo.

 For the first time in TV history, ikono has launched an arts festival taking place exclusively on TV and live webstream. Until the 29th September 2013, the ikono On Air Festival will air a daily program of over 200 international established and emerging video artists. The festival can be experienced through the HDTV channels ikonoTV and ikono MENASA, which currently reach over 30 countries worldwide, and is also available on all mobile devices including computers, tablets and smartphones. If you are in Berlin, you can catch the ikono On Air Festival at a number of cafes, bars and cultural institutions.

The ikono On Air Festival follows ikono’s vision of building a visual bridge between periods of time, various movements and disciplines throughout art history. Contemporary perspectives on filmmaking and other time-based art forms from the last decades are linked with ikono video clip highlights featuring art from antiquity to modern classics. The ikono On Air Festival invites the audience to trace the perception of time within the arts, while the featured artworks challenge ideas of social space, everyday life and the possibilities of cultural communication.

 

 

II PALAZZO ENCICLOPEDICO (THE ENCYCLOPEDIC PALACE) : MELBOURNE OFFSITE FOR THE 55TH VENICE BIENNALE

Platform Contemporary Art Space, Melbourne, Australia

For this exhibition Platform is re-imagined as an unofficial Melbourne off-site venue for the Venice Biennale. The selected artists will respond to curator Massimiliano Gioni’s theme, Il Palazzo Enciclopedico (The Encyclopaedic Palace), which derives from an imaginary museum conceived by Marino Auriti in the 1950’s. It encapsulates an ideal of universal knowledge and the democratisation of information. Within this artist-run exhibition, Auriti’s vision of The Encyclopaedic Palace is unhindered by the specificity of Venice.

                                                                                                                                                                                   Poured, 2013 at Platform Contemporary Art Space  

                                          

                                                                                                                                                                                  Soaked, 2013 at Platform Contemporary Art Space

 

 

CHANNELS: THE AUSTRALIAN VIDEO ART FESTIVAL

Channels is a new international biennial festival based in Melbourne that will showcase contemporary video practice from Australia and around the world. In September 2013 Channels will host an eclectic and playful programme of screenings, performances, workshops and artist commissions designed to provoke curiosity and engagement amongst the arts and broader community. The three-day Festival (along with a 10-day commissions exhibition) will offer a thoughtful selection of work from some of the world’s most interesting and outstanding video makers.

                                                                                                                                                                     The Ice Shaver, 2013 at Federation Square's Big Screen

 

Channels Festival from Kawita Vatanajyankur on Vimeo.

 

Venues: 

Speakeasy Cinema at Howler

14 Dawson Street, Brunswick
Entry via car park on Dawson Street,
opposite Brunswick City Baths

Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
Federation Square Melbourne
Open daily 10am-5pm
Customer Service (Mon-Fri 9am-5pm): (03) 8663 2200
Ticket Enquiries (daily 10am-5pm): (03) 8663 2583

Screen Space
Ground Floor, 30 Guildford Lane Melbourne
Thurs – Sat 12pm-6pm

Chin Chin’s Wall of Art
Chin Chin Wall of Art
Higson/Flinders Lanes Melbourne
Mon – Sun from dusk until late

Big Screen at Federation Square
Flinders St Melbourne

La Trobe University City Campus
Room 104, 215 Franklin St, Melbourne CBD

ikono On Air

For more information, please visit www.channelsfestival.net.au

 

 PRESENTED BY

 

 

HUA KRATHI PROJECT

By Australian Thai Artist Interchange

Curated by Melanie Jayne Taylor, Rushdi Anwar and Shukit Panmongkol

Federation Square 13th-20th March 2013

RMIT School of Art Gallery 14th-22th March 2013

 

The Hua Krathi Project presents the work of 14 contemporary Thai artists that span the mediums of installation, sculpture, media art, drawing, painting and photography to showcase the diversity of Thai culture. Their work represents a divergence from the traditional mediums and approaches to art making, offering Australian audiences a taste of this fresh contemporary approach.

Shifting away from the exotic and tropical identity of Thailand, the project explores the conflicts between the rural and the urban Thai landscape, whilst addressing contemporary developmental issues of the socio-political, the cultural and the personal. Similarly to how Hua Krathi – the cream of the coconut - is used to bring a richness to the diversity of flavours in Thai food, each artist in The Hua Krathi Project brings conceptual and contextual finesse to create artworks in a mélange of mediums that reveal the range of issues that face modern Thai society.

Coinciding with the 10th Anniversary of Thai Culture and Food Festival, the visual art program features a two week exhibition at the RMIT University School of Art Gallery; a three week exhibition at Screen Space and a pop up gallery housed in a Shipping Container at the Amphitheatre in Federation Square. The program also features a panel discussion at The Edge (formally known as BMW Edge) and artist and visiting international curator talks at RMIT University.

Featuring Santiphap Inkong- ngam, Kornkrit Jianpinidnan, Paphonsak La- or, Lipikorn Makaew, Ohm Pattanachoti, Kata Sangkhae, Thasnai Sethaseree, Vipoo Srivilasa, Sutthirat Supaparinya, Tul Suwannakit, Phaptawan Suwannakudt, Jedsada Tangtrakulwong, Jakraphun Thanateeranon and Kawita Vatanajuyankur, The Hua Krathi project aims to assist the cultural exchange between Australia and Thailand through a greater understanding, and awareness of the synergies that exist between Australian and Thai culture. The project will also strengthen the relationship between these two countries and nurture future collaborations.

 

 

POP-UP MIGRANTS

The Tinder Box Studio, Melbourne, Australia

18 December 2011

Pop-Up Migrants” is a compelling art show focused on migrants’ experience in Australia who historically “crossed borders” to a new environment where they were strangers at first, then disorientated, then little by little contributing to shape Australian culture. The term Pop-Up is intended to recall the situation in which unexpected diversity intervenes to "shake things up".

This project has been created to represent Australia for the action initiated by the Immigrant Movement International from the US and to celebrate the International Migrants Day designated by the United Nations.  

PRESENTED BY